ObamaCare, Hubris and Hospital Treatment

 ObamaCare, Hubris and Hospital Treatment

There is clear and compelling evidence, presented not only in this blog but in multiple sources, that the designers of ObamaCare (I refuse to use the misleading “Affordable Care Act” any longer) had the British National Health Service (NHS) in mind as a model. In a charitable view, those designers simply misunderstood the realities of the NHS. In a more likely view the developers, including Obama himself, saw the existing iteration of the U.S. version as simply a step on the way to a completely single-payer, government run health system identical to the NHS. A necessary component of this interim step was a built-in designed-to-fail process justifying the federal government’s eventual need to step in and take over the whole system. Obama himself has stated that a single-payer system is his goal.
Where hubris enters the picture is not just as some Conservative commentators have already pointed out, that is, using the contemporary understanding of the term hubris to mean “excessive confidence or arrogance, which leads a person to believe that he or she may do no wrong.” This is a typical connotation of hubris found in many sources, even business as in the following:

““Hubris may be developed after a person encounters a period of success. Corporate executives and traders overcome by hubris may become a liability for their firms. A manager might start making business decisions without fully thinking through the consequences, or a trader may begin taking on excessive risk.”   [http://www.investopedia.com/terms/h/hubris.asp]

This is an attractive way of putting the argument because the current Chief Executive exemplifies the contemporary understanding of hubris as well as the literary discussions of hubris in Greek tragedy. For example:
“Hubris is excessive pride (or ‘”overweening’ pride), and is often called ‘the pride that comes before the fall.’ It had serious consequences in Greek tragedyand law.”
This particular commentator writes:
 Aristotlediscusses hubris in Rhetoric1378b. Editor J. H. Freese notes about this passage: In Attic law hubris (insulting, degrading treatment) was a more serious offence than aikia (bodily ill-treatment). It was the subject of a State criminal prosecution (graphê), aikia of a private action (dikê) for damages. The penalty was assessed in court, and might even be death.” [<http://ancienthistory.about.com/od/heroicbehavior/g/Hubris.htm>]
While some online translations of the cited section of Aristotle’s Rhetoric do not use the term hubris or hybris, the cited section does deal extensively with anger, particularly in individuals who feel they have been wronged by others. This is very interesting when you consider the forceful implementation  of ObamaCare over the objections of a majority of Americans in terms of the implications in Dinesh D’Souza’s best seller The Roots of Obama’s Rage and Obama’s Socialist parentage and Marxist mentors.
What Will This Hubris on the Part of Obama and the Progressives Bring Us?
Look at the realities of the NHS—report after report after report of deficiencies and ill-treatment of patients.
The most recent:
I.The NHS received its review by the British press this past year on an almost daily basis. Headlines blared across the UK, endlessly documenting scandalous patient care, shameful waiting lists, catastrophic hospital practices, and financial debacle.”
“One critical distinction generally lost amid the naïve but passionate backers of nationalized insurance is the difference between being insured and having access to care.
Despite the chest-thumping that everyone is insured, U.K. citizens relying on the NHS experience unconscionable problems with access to care, problems not even remotely found in the U.S.”
“At the end of June, the number of people waiting in England to start NHS treatment was 240,000 higher than the same time last year. NHS England figures for July showed that 508,555 people in London alone were waiting for operations or other treatment to begin . . . .. Almost 60,000 more patients were waiting for treatment at the capital’s 34 NHS hospitals than one year ago.”
NHS August 2013 figures report a five-year high in hospital waiting lists.  In London alone there were “almost 2.9 million patients with a known diagnosis in the queue for treatment. In Wales, the number of patients waiting more than nine months for hospital treatment in November had more than doubled in six months. The Welsh government also reported their NHS is still failing to treat 8 to 13% of the most urgent cancer cases within 62 days – two full months after diagnosis.”
2. “NHS dentistry is ‘unfit for purpose’ as a result of successive Governments’ obsession with centralised targets at the cost of allowing professionals to spend enough time with patients, Ministers have been warned. More than 100 family dentists have signed a letter to the Telegraph which accuses Ministers of hiding the ‘rotten truth’ about the ‘compromised and mismanaged’ system of state-funded dental treatment in England.
“They say the ‘continuous limitations and compromises’ that hamper their work mean it is impossible for them to deliver the high standards of care to the whole population promised by the Government. The signatories highlight findings that tooth decay is the third most common reason for a child to be admitted to hospital and that nearly half of all adults suffer from serious gum problems.
“They write: ‘We are witnessing the manipulation of Government figures and statistics that hide the rotten truth, such as dumbing-down how decay is measured and reported, by avoiding modern methods like X-Rays. Just using ‘visible’ eyesight alone misses the hidden decay that’s rotting the population’s teeth.”
Source: Sam Marsden, “NHSdentistry is unfit for purpose,” January 2, 2014.